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My husband and I , with our dog, Tate, moved to Buenos Aires.. Life has never been the same since ~ Back in the USA ... life is still not the same !
It takes a lot of courage to release the familiar and seemingly secure, to embrace the new.
But there is no real security in what is no longer meaningful.
There is more security in the adventurous and exciting, for in movement there is life, and in change there is power.
Alan Cohen
"Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend.
Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read."
Groucho Marx
The doors we open and close each day decide the lives we live.

Sunday, September 8, 2013

Sunday Drive

The drive started out with no destination other than Let's go in a new direction.
So we turned left after the bridge and that was that.
It turned into one of those drives where you want to stop the car every few feet to hop out and take another photo.
Woods, dark and deep. Trees , ancient, huge and waiting to drop a gazillion leaves.
Streams, stone bridges, long drives leading to storybook beautiful homes.
Horses, cows and sheep.
Lots of sheep.

Old Chatham Sheepherding Company


I am now in love with the village of Old Chatham and I want to live there. 
It is part of where we live already, in a way .. Old, New, Center etc ..

We drove past the General store and figured we would look around a bit. 
We saw sheep. Lots of sheep. then we went back for coffee. 
It was nice. There is a big stove in the middle of the room that will make it toasty warm in cold weather, I look forward to going there then too. The people working there were kinda grumpy but maybe it was just such a pretty day and they didn't want to be inside working. 
I will give them a second chance. 

I need to check the real estate websites. 
My dream house might be in Old Chatham.

Meanwhile, back here in this house, the hydrangeas are aging nicely and going from white to pink. Who knew ??
We walked up the hill to say hello to the sheep and Highland cows and the horse.
I wonder, does that horse get lonesome, with no one but sheep and cows to talk to ?
Hawks are flying over the fields. I imagine mice are hiding and a few rabbits.
Life in the country.





4 comments:

Linda said...

Sooooo...
Is this finally a picture of your house??
If it is...I hate you!
That is GEEEE-orgeous!

Cheers!
Linda :o)

Mary said...

I don't think that is your new home is it?

There are always beautiful houses everywhere......what's more important is being happy with the one we choose and turning it into a happy home! I know you are doing this - takes time but will be worth it.

BTW, a home is like it's garden, never finished. I'm now planning to replace my downstairs flooring - carpet has to go - I want a farmhouse style with wide planks, wish me luck!

Hugs - Mary

Sabrina said...

OH how absolutely lovely - that place is going to be so gorgeous when the fall colors are out!!!! Reminds me of the places where we went to get pumpkins when I was a kid... like Pound Ridge, etc. xx

Furtheron said...

"OLD"!!! Chatham... I beg to differ m' Lord.

I present my evidence.

Source Wikipedia...

The name Chatham was first recorded as Cetham in 880. Most books explain this name as a British root ceto (like Welsh coed) plus Old English ham, thus meaning a forest settlement. However, the river-valley situation of Chatham is more consistent with cet being an Old English survival of the element catu that was common in Roman-era names and meant 'basin' or 'valley'.

Chatham stands on the A2 road along the line of the ancient Celtic route, which was paved by the Romans, and named Watling Street by the Anglo-Saxons. Among finds have been the remains of a Roman cemetery. After the Norman invasion the manor of Chatham, originally Saxon, was given by William the Conqueror to Earl Godwinson.

It long remained a small village on the banks of the river, but by the 16th century was being used to harbour warships, because of its strategic sheltered location between London and the Continent. It was established as a Royal Dockyard by Queen Elizabeth I in 1568.


So look this Chatham (who cares about the spelling!) was most likely inhabited in Roman times and definitely from Saxon into the Norman times and was from 1568 a major royal dockyard until it closed (putting all my family out of work!) in the 1980s.

So how do you get to name one "Old" when it was only settled 188 years after good old Queen Liz founded the dockyard?

We should rename ours "Ancient Chatham" then... ;-)

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